Renault Kwid Engine & First Drive

Renault Kwid Overview

Renault has surprised India with the Kwid concept at the 2014 Auto Expo and launched the production car in October 2015. The Kwid carried the essence of the concept of being a super compact SUV and with its size and aggressive pricing, was positioned amongst the compact hatchbacks.The high level of localisation makes the Kwid highly affordable. This has been built on a new CMF-A platform that has been built with high localisation. The Kwid hence, has turned out to be the highest selling car in the Renault line-up.The Renault Kwid competes with the Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 and the Hyundai Eon and the Daatsun Redi-Go. The Datsun Go could also be considered as a competition to this product. The newly introduced Kwid 1.0-litre competes with Alto K10, Wagon R, Eon 1.0-litre and Chevrolet Spark. For information on contact details of Renault car dealers in Mumbai

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Renault Kwid Style

The Renault Kwid, happily, doesn’t evoke any of that. Dimensionally, it belongs to its class but design wise it is not anything we have ever seen in the segment. With its SUV inspired styling and a much modern design, it will strike a quick rapport with both the vibrant young as well as the sanely matured. Not an exaggeration to say, this ne also proved to be a looker as we kept answering the curious beings all over.

A dark chain linked grille holds the bold Renault logo on the front with slender clear lens headlamps to the side. To add some razzmatazz, there is chrome detailing done inside the headlamps. Move behind and you would see the muscular contours curving below the grille. The fog lamp housing also gets swanky matte surround; affixed to the bumper.

The front hood has multiple characteristic lines to make it look more appealing and the same can be felt with the steeply designed windscreen. The strong shoulder line flows from the muscular wheel arch in the front before parting way and moving up towards the C-pillar. The efforts taken to make the Kwid look distinct from other offerings can be seen with intricate detailing done on the side such as scooped door handle pockets, boxy fuel lid shape and other contour lines on the side profile.

The ORVMs are done in contrasting black and need to be manually adjusted from outside. The matte cladding running over squarish wheel arches on the front and rear doesn’t look out of sync and instead blend nicely with the overall arrangement. The tall ground clearance of 180mm makes it sound relevant to the SUV inspiration and is also a best in class feature.

Renault Kwid Space

One step into the Kwid and you already know you are getting into a fairly spacious hatchback by segment standards. The chunky steering wheel is neatly shaped and the Kwid comes with a digital instrument cluster, which is a first for its class. It comes with a elaborate trip computer and fuel economy reading which should help budget car buyers alter their driving style to eke out more efficiency.

The quality of plastics for a car of its price is quite good except for places like the door handles and aircon controls but overall the Kwid doesn’t look like it’s built cheap. There are plenty of storage spaces in the Kwid – two glove boxes, the top one with a bottle holder, two bottle holders in the front door pockets and plenty of scooped up places in the dashboard and in front of the gear lever. The seats are of the foamy, cushiony kind, and well contoured for the front passengers. The headrest is integrated and there’s decent under thigh support. It’s a spacious entry level hatchback, and in terms of boot space, it’s better than a few cars above the segment as well. At 300 litres, you can carry a big suitcase and an overnighter comfortably.

The Kwid has the longest wheelbase in its class at 2423mm, about 60mm more than the Alto and 40mm more than the Eon. It is also much wider than its closest competition and so you get more legroom and shoulder room. The Kwid’s packaging is seriously impressive.

Renault Kwid Gearbox

There are obvious hints in the Kwid which show Renault recognises that part of the strategy in this segment is playing a mind-game. But, we wonder if the choice of a 800cc engine was also one that was influenced by this market reality. But eitherways, with the “Kitna Deti Hai?” question being a constant, it is good to note that the Kwid’s 799cc petrol engine is the most frugal in the segment. This three-cylinder engine is not as refined as the one’s in cars one segment above, but when compared to the Alto 800 or the Hyundai Eon, it is about very similar in idling character. Cabin noise levels are fairly well contained, though we felt vibration levels could have been lower. The test mule we drove was a pre-production model; hopefully the final versions will be better insulated.

The engine itself is a fairly peppy unit, for its size. Generating 54PS of peak power, and 74Nm of torque, the engine delivers much of this at lower rpm levels, though the peaks are hit closer to 5,000rpm. But, its ability to respond quickly to driver inputs seems to be affected by the throttle mapping. Overall, the focus seems to have been to squeeze the most fuel efficiency from the powertrain. Speaking of which, the engine is paired to a 5-speed gearbox. Shift quality is good and there is none of the rubbery feel that some of the other cars in the segment have.

Renault Kwid Driving

A lesson Renault has learnt with the Duster is that a rugged high ground clearance car will find its takers here and with the Kwid, the carmaker delivers just that. Riding high at 180mm, the Kwid has the highest ground clearance in its class. And considering it’s a short wheelbase, this will be more than enough to go over just about every large speed breaker the country has in store for it. The high ground clearance also gives excellent visibility out of the driver’s seat making it a very easy car to drive around town. What impressed us right away is the ride quality of this tiny hatchback. The Kwid uses MacPherson struts up front and twist beam suspension at the rear and the setup is tuned to perfection for our roads. Large undulations are evened out impressively and broken roads don’t throw you about inside the car like most hatchbacks in this segment do.

The nice chunky steering and the driving position are spot on. You sit at a good height and there is no offset pedal nonsense or steering on your chest sort of feeling that budget cars tend to have. The Kwid has considerable roll but not of the scary kind. You know you can keep it together when you are hustling this Renault baby, and in fact it is good fun to chuck around corners, much like the Alto. Just 660kg of mass to stop does ease pressure off the tiny disc brakes up front and the drums in the rear. The brakes could do with a bit more play though and the 155 section tyres with a bit more bite. When weight is on your side however, you can get away with a little less grip. Renault should however have an ABS equipped variant in the lineup too, which is not on offer as of now.

Renault Kwid Safety

The Renault Kwid’s safety kit has improved in 2018, but still leaves a lot to be desired. The Kwid gets a driver side airbag on the top-end RxT (O) variant but a passenger airbag isn’t available even as an option. Additionally, anti-lock brakes (ABS) are still a glaring miss from the safety package. What has improved in the 2018 Kwid is the addition of a rear camera and 3-point ELR seatbelts for two rear seat occupants. The middle passenger still gets a lap belt. Overall, Renault will have to do better with the Kwid in this department if it wants to see more reassuring crash test results.

Renault Kwid Cost in Hyderabad

Renault Kwid Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 2,71,444/- (Kwid STD) to 4,70,899/- (Kwid RXT 1.0 O Superhero Edition AMT). Get best offers for Renault Kwid from Renault Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Kwid price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Renault Kwid Conclusion

If it is your first car, and you haven’t experienced a torque converter or dual clutch automatic before, the Kwid AMT will prove both easy to drive and agreeable to own. The gearshifts aren’t jerky, the throttle is linear and responsive, and thanks to the 1-litre engine, it is also energetic to drive in the city. We haven’t tested it for fuel economy yet, but we expect it to return efficiency figures matching the manual Kwid 1.0. What’s more, it carries over the highlights of the Kwid: a light steering, a plush low speed ride and clear visibility.

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